Building a client base is an ever-present challenge for interpreters. Whether you’re just starting out or having been in the business for years, you always need to be on the lookout for new opportunities. Fortunately, there are several ways to market yourself as the right person for the job. Sometimes a well-crafted resume is enough, but sometimes you need to get a little more creative. Below are five ways to get more interpreting clients—from traditional methods that still work to outside-of-the-box ideas.

 

  1. Highlight Your Area(s) of Specialization

 

Language and interpreting skills are only half of the equation when it comes to getting hired. Potential clients also need someone who understands their industry and has the required credentials. Getting certified in your field is one the best ways to do just that. In some industries, such as healthcare and legal, you may need a state or national certification to qualify for most jobs. If your area of specialization doesn’t have a certification program, highlight your professional training, any continuing education courses, and/or membership in industry-related organizations.

 

  1. Build Your Remote Interpreting Skills

 

Remote interpreting is quickly becoming the norm in healthcare, business, and even legal settings. Yet it poses some unique challenges that onsite interpreters don’t face. From more difficulty building a rapport between participants to trouble with technology, it takes some adjusting to make the switch. However, with a little practice you can improve your remote interpreting skills. If you already have experience, be sure to highlight that when you market yourself to potential clients.

 

  1. Network, Network, Network

 

As with any field, people prefer to work with someone they know and trust. While COVID-19 has made it more difficult to make new connections, virtual events and conferences are still great ways to find new clients. By attending virtually, you’ll also keep up with industry trends, learn about the latest technology, and even earn continuing education credits.

 

  1. Film a Video Introduction

 

If you really want to stand out from the competition, film a short video introduction to send to potential clients. This lets you showoff your professionalism—and language skills—in a more personable way. Potential clients will get a better feel for who you are beyond your resume. If you have a website, be sure to upload it there as well.

 

  1. Use an Online Interpretation Platform

 

As an independent contractor, you’re responsible prospecting, scheduling, and tracking your finances. Staying organized is of the utmost importance if you wan to succeed. And here’s where the right software can help. Built with interpreters in mind, Boostlingo’s interpretation platform lets you manage your schedule—and your income all in one place. And thanks to our web/mobile app, you can accept new assignments no matter where you are. You never have to worry about missing an opportunity.

 

Want to find out if Boostlingo is right for you? Start your free trial today!

 

 

The United States is the land of linguistic diversity—with at least 350 languages spoken at home. Although Spanish, Chinese, and French round out the three most common after English, millions of residents speak a language of lesser diffusion. While each of these cultures add to America’s diversity, language barriers can make it difficult to access healthcare, legal services, and more.

 

If you need an interpreter who speaks Spanish, even on short notice, you’ll likely find one without much trouble. Yet what if you need someone who speaks Swahili? Or Telugu? Depending on where you live, this can pose a major challenge. Fortunately, remote interpreting options make it easy to find an interpreter regardless of your location—or theirs.

 

But before we get into the benefits of remote interpreting, let’s take a look at the linguistic diversity across the country.

 

Language Diversity Across America

 

The U.S. Census Bureau released a set of its most comprehensive data on languages in November 2015. Based on American Community Survey data, it includes information on 350 languages. Below are some statistics from five of the largest metropolitan areas.

 

New York

 

  • At least 192 languages are spoken at home.
  • Bengali, with 105,765 speakers, is one of the area’s smaller language groups.

 

Los Angeles

 

  • At least 185 languages are spoken at home.
  • Indonesian, with 12,750 speakers, is one of the area’s smaller language groups.

 

Chicago

 

  • At least 153 languages are spoken at home.
  • Serbian, with 17,490 speakers, is one of the area’s smaller language groups.

 

Dallas

 

  • At least 156 languages are spoken at home.
  • Telugu, with 12,630 speakers, is one of the area’s smallest language groups.

 

Philadelphia

 

  • At least 146 languages are spoken at home.
  • Malayalam, with 10,370 speakers is one of the area’s smallest language groups.

 

The Benefits of Remote Interpreting

 

As you can see, even languages of lesser diffusion may make up relatively large communities, especially in metropolitan areas. However, there may still be a shortage of professional interpreters who speak that language. Here’s where remote interpreting comes.

 

There are two methods of remote interpreting: over-the-phone and video remote. Both methods let you work with an interpreter without bringing them onsite. This not only helps you save on travel expenses, but can help you get an interpreter on short notice.

 

So, how do you connect with a remote interpreter? One way is through Boostlingo’s easy-to-use interpreting platform. All you need is a phone or webcam and internet access. There’s no need to download any software. Plus, you’ll gain access to the Boostlingo Professional Interpreter Network, which includes interpreters who speak over 200 languages.

 

Want to find out if Boostlingo is right for you? Start your free trial today!

 

 

The 2020-2021 school year may turn out to be one of the most challenging in recent history. From virtual classes to hybrid learning to new restrictions in the classroom due to COVID-19, students and teachers will need to quickly adapt. But one thing that hasn’t changed? The need for interpreters in education.

 

Interpreting in Higher Education

In 2018, the number of international students in the U.S. reached a new high of 1.9 million. As the top study abroad destination, the U.S. offers numerous benefits for students who want to get ahead in today’s world. Yet in order to fully take advantage of this opportunity, many students must first overcome language barriers. Here’s where educational interpreters come.

Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, schools must ensure that that students who are learning English have an equal opportunity to succeed academically. By offering interpreting services, colleges and universities can give limited-English proficient (LEP) students the support they need to do just that.

Interpreting in K-12 Education

International college students aren’t the only ones who need assistance from an educational interpreter, either. K-12 students who have recently relocated to the U.S. or primarily speak another language at home typically need language support while they’re learning English.

According to The Pew Research Center, there were nearly five million English language learners in the U.S. public school system as of 2015. Of those students, the majority speak Spanish at home in 45 states and Washington D.C. However, the majority in states such as Maine and Vermont spoke less common languages, such as Somali and Nepali, respectively.

This puts teachers and school administrators in difficult position given the circumstances. Students still need help from interpreters, but many are learning from home. And even if students are returning to the classroom, schools may be hesitant to bring interpreters onsite.

Educational Video Remote Interpreting to the Rescue

Fortunately, video remote interpreting gives students access to an interpreter in the classroom and at home. With Boostlingo, teachers can connect with an interpreter in seconds. And thanks to the Boostlingo Professional Interpreters Network (BPIN), they’ll have access to interpreters who speak over 200 languages, including American Sign Language (ASL). Plus, our new Zoom integration feature makes it easy to help LEP students, without giving up the platform that teachers grown comfortable using.

If you want to read about how one school system, Davenport Community School District, adopted educational video remote interpreting, download our case study here.

Want to learn more about how Boostlingo can help in the classroom? Contact us today to schedule your demo!