Medical interpreters

As more COVID-19 vaccines undergo clinical trials, the end of the pandemic may soon be in sight. However, developing a vaccine is only the first step. Distributing it throughout the U.S. population will pose another challenge—particularly in communities of color. Although groups such as Blacks and Latinos are at a higher risk for serious complications, many of them mistrust the medical establishment.

 

In order to keep all Americans safe, healthcare professionals will need to build trust in these communities through education and outreach. That means medical interpreters will play a vital role in Latino and other limited English proficiency (LEP) communities. But before we dive into the benefits of medical interpreting, let’s take a look at some statistics.

 

The Trust Gap in Black and Latino Communities

 

A study by Langer Research found that only 66% of Latinos would agree to a coronavirus vaccine, even if it were free of charge. That number drops below 50% among Black respondents. Doubts about safety and effectiveness seem to drive these numbers as only:

 

  • 14% of Black people trust that the vaccine is safe, while 18% trust it will be effective.
  • 34% of Latinos trust the vaccine’s safety, and 40% trust its effectiveness.

 

Black respondents also cited historical reasons for their mistrust. Medical experiments, such as the Tuskegee syphilis study, were conducted without the knowledge or consent of Black participants. Latinos mentioned similar fears as well as lack of trust in the government to have their best interests in mind.

 

The nonprofit that commissioned the report expressed concerns about a similar hesitancy among Native Americans, Asians, and other non-white ethnic groups.

 

How Medical Interpreters Can Help

 

While there’s no quick fix to improve trust, providing accurate information and taking the time to address concerns may go a long way. As healthcare professionals begin outreach, they’ll also need to provide language support for members of LEP communities. And here’s where professional medical interpreters come in.

 

Although bilingual staff and family members are often called upon to help, they typically don’t make the best interpreters. That’s because medical interpreters are specially trained in interpreting and medical terminology. They also serve as a neutral third-party whose sole purpose is to facilitate communication between the patient and the healthcare provider. Patients may feel more comfortable using an interpreter for this very reason.

 

Why Remote Medical Interpreting Is a Safer Choice

 

Bringing an interpreter onsite is often the best option. However, due to the health risks, healthcare providers may prefer to connect with a medical interpreter remotely—either via video remote or over the phone.

Fortunately, the BoostCare Telehealth platform makes it easy to connect with a medical interpreter within minutes. Our Boostlingo Professional Interpreter Network (BPIN) includes interpreters who speak over 200 languages and are ready to assist.

 

Think Boostlingo may be right for your practice? Contact us today to start your free trial!

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *